OK Wildlife Conservation Preventing Zombie Deer

“Zombie Deer Attack!” 9″x16″ original tone drawing by Sam Flegal.

Oklahomans survived the Dust Bowl and persevered through multiple natural disasters, but can we survive the plague of zombie deer?

That’s right; there’s a new thing to fear.

The virus, known as Chronic Wasting Disease, may be heading toward the state. According to an Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation press release, the department is taking the “best steps it can to prevent the spread of an always-deadly disease for deer to Oklahoma.”

Via KOCO.com:

The Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation says it’s taking the best steps it can to prevent the spread of an always-deadly disease for deer to Oklahoma.

Chronic Wasting Disease has killed deer, elk and moose in Texas, Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico and 19 other states, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The federal agency says the possibility that CWD could be spread to people cannot be ruled out.

Said to be similar to Mad Cow Disease and with no known cure, the Department of Wildlife Conservation says the neurological disease attacks the brains of deer and other members of the deer family, creating holes that resemble those in sponges.

To make a scary story short, zombie deer may roam among us.

Also, let’s spare a thought for this sentence: “The federal agency says the possibility that CWD could be spread to people cannot be ruled out.” When I ask the question, “Can I get a disease from an animal that essentially rots the brain,” I expect to hear the word, “No.”

The fact that scientists aren’t sure it’s contagious to humans, unless through consumption, is horrifying.

Scientists did say to dispose of the animal properly, if one believes it is contaminated. Basically, it’s asking hunters to also be scientists. The only time this happens is if it’s the DC universe and you’re Oliver Queen. After knowing some hunters in the state, I’d say we’re on a slippery slope to zombification.

In order to dispose of the animal, they recommend the deer carcass “should be buried on the property where they were harvested if possible, left in place or disposed of at an approved, lined landfill.”

So let’s add waste-management collector to the list of requirements to hunt deer.

I’ll tell you what, let’s all do each other a favor: don’t hunt deer, until we’re sure that we won’t become zombies. Pick up a new eating habit, like a vegetable. If this doesn’t satisfy your hunger for the hunt, try shooting animals on games like Red Dead Redemption 2.

Oklahoma has enough problems, without the threat of the undead coming from deer diseases. Let’s try not to catch what dystopian novelists dream of, for the time being.