10 movies that should’ve been filmed in Oklahoma

Good news, local film buffs, aspiring actors, and Leonardo DiCaprio girlfriend-wannabes!

Last month, Governor Stitt signed into law the Filmed in Oklahoma Act of 2021, which provides corporate welfare to out-of-state corporations in return for them filming their movies in our starstruck state.

We think this is a great idea because…

1. Bragging rights

2. It helps the economy and the local film industry, which in return, helps the local “tabloid” media industry.

3. Production companies have already missed too many great opportunities to film in Oklahoma!

Just think about that last one for a second. Instead of giving all tax breaks and subsidies to Oil Overlords, what if Oklahoma lawmakers were boosting the movie industry 25 to 50 to even 100 years ago? Imagine all the great movies that could have, and thus should have, been filmed in Oklahoma.

Here are 10 that Patrick and I came up with:

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The Free (To Me) Sandwiches of Sandoitchi

I very rarely, if ever, get invited to the opening of a restaurant, let alone a pop-up food experience. Yet, somehow, I was sent an invitation to come out and try Sandoitchi, a semi-new sandwich concept that, apparently, is only available on Sundays. Normally I’d say no, but, seriously, how can you screw up a sandwich?

The shop was set up in an abandoned restaurant in the Plaza District, one that I think I reviewed a couple of years ago when it was a ramen joint. I showed up with my dog in tow—it was only a few blocks from my house, natch—and waited the scant few minutes as they got their specialized sandwiches ready to take home and sample, placing them neatly in small boxes and paper bags.

As I met and shook hands with both the public relations people and the varied cooks on the line, it was explained to me that Sandoitchi was—if I can remember this right—a Texas-based business that was branching out to Oklahoma City, offering their fast-selling sandwiches on an extremely limited basis, I guess to get a feel for the place and its sandwich needs.

They handed me my bag, with four of their most popular sandwiches inside. Served on the thick white bread that is typically used for, as I recall, Texas toast, they ranged most rapidly on the scale of my own personal tastes. For example, there are two chicken (or possibly pork) specialties: a plain one and a hot one. Here are the pics:

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