Mary Fallin cares about teacher pay now

Last Friday, Mary Fallin stopped by a Dallas School District Job Fair at the Embassy Suites hotel near the OU Medical Center campus.

Oddly enough, she wasn’t there to look for a job or receive an award for making Oklahoma such a fertile place for out-of-state school districts to recruit underpaid teachers. She was there to film a video in a last-ditch effort to salvage her political legacy and make people think she cares about teacher pay.

Check it out:

That’s adorable! Look at Mary finally attempting to show some leadership and bring attention to the teacher pay crisis that all happened under her watch! Maybe next week she’ll go to a job fair in Arkansas to support the 198 Oklahoma Health Department employees who are facing layoffs thanks to another massive failure of her administration.

Randy Krehbiel had a breakdown of Fallin’s visit in the The Tulsa World:

Dallas Independent School District recruiters were probably a little surprised when Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin showed up at their booth in Oklahoma City one morning last week…

Fallin shot a Facebook video in which she says she called the Legislature into a second special session next week because it didn’t pass a teacher raise during the spring regular session or the first special session this fall. Through Monday afternoon the video has had 14,000 views, more than 80 shares and hundreds of comments.

Although no one seems to have paid much attention, Fallin has for years said the state’s greatest economic handicap is education. And now, as her second term winds down, she’s really pounding the pulpit.

Great news, teachers! The ineffective, politically weak governor who hasn’t been able to secure one teacher pay raise during her seven years in office is out “pounding the pulpit” for you. I’m sure that’s comforting. Maybe the 8th time will be the charm! But if not, don’t worry. You can always just move to Dallas and get a huge pay raise:

The Dallas Independent School District, Fallin says in the video, starts teachers at about $50,000. Oklahoma starts its teachers at $32,000 “plus benefits.”